S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 8: Sleep disorders and problems in an elite super rugby union team

November 22, 2018

Ian C. Dunican, Jennifer Walsh, Charles C. Higgins, Maddison J. Jones, Kathleen Maddison, John A. Caldwell, Hillman David & Peter R. Eastwood (2018) Prevalence of sleep disorders and sleep problems in an elite super rugby union team, Journal of Sports Sciences, DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2018.1537092

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders in an elite rugby union team using in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) and sleep questionnaires. Twenty-five elite rugby union players underwent a night of PSG during the “off-season” of the Super Rugby competition to assess their sleep. Of interest were measurements that detected the presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; apnea-hypopnea index ≥5 events/hr) and the presence of moderate-severe periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMs; ≥15 events/hr). Players completed sleep-related questionnaires to assess daytime sleepiness, perception of insomnia, risk of OSA, and the presence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and underwent basic anthropometric assessments including body mass index and neck circumference. OSA was present in 24% (n=6) of players and PLMs ≥15 events/hr in 12% (n=3). Questionnaire responses showed that all players had insomnia defined subthreshold insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, two players were identified as being at risk for OSA and none were classified as having RLS. In conclusion, sleep disorders and excessive sleepiness are common in elite rugby union players. A process to identify and manage sleep disorders should be considered by teams to optimise their physical recovery, athletic performance and to safeguard their health.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2018.1537092?journalCode=rjsp20

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 6: Sleep in a live-in mining operation: the influence of start times and restricted non-work activities.

November 7, 2018

In this episode we take a look at sleep in a fly in fly out mining operation.

Abstract: Good sleep is essential for optimal performance, yet few studies have examined the sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early-morning training on the amount of sleep obtained by world-class swimmers. A squad of seven swimmers from the Australian Institute of Sport participated in this study during 14 days of high-intensity training in preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games. During these 14 days, participants had 12 training days, each starting with a session at 06:00 h, and 2 rest days. For each day, the amount of sleep obtained by participants was determined using self-report sleep diaries and wrist-worn activity monitors. On nights that preceded training days, participants went to bed at 22:05 h (s=00:52), arose at 05:48 h (s=00:24) and obtained 5.4 h (s=1.3) of sleep. On nights that preceded rest days, participants went to bed at 00:32 h (s=01:29), arose at 09:47 h (s=01:47) and obtained 7.1 h (s=1.2) of sleep. Mixed model analyses revealed that on nights prior to training days, bedtimes and get-up times were significantly earlier (p<0.001), time spent in bed was significantly shorter (p<0.001) and the amount of sleep obtained was significantly less (p<0.001), than on nights prior to rest days. These results indicate that early-morning training sessions severely restrict the amount of sleep obtained by elite athletes. Given that chronic sleep restriction of <6 h per night can impair psychological and physiological functioning, it is possible that early-morning schedules actually limit the effectiveness of training

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24444223

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 5: Sleep or swim? Early-morning training severely restricts the amount of sleep obtained by elite swimmers.

November 1, 2018

In this weeks Audio Abstract Review we we take a look at Sleep or swim? Early-morning training severely restricts the amount of sleep obtained by elite swimmers.

Good sleep is essential for optimal performance, yet few studies have examined the sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early-morning training on the amount of sleep obtained by world-class swimmers. A squad of seven swimmers from the Australian Institute of Sport participated in this study during 14 days of high-intensity training in preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games. During these 14 days, participants had 12 training days, each starting with a session at 06:00 h, and 2 rest days. For each day, the amount of sleep obtained by participants was determined using self-report sleep diaries and wrist-worn activity monitors. On nights that preceded training days, participants went to bed at 22:05 h (s=00:52), arose at 05:48 h (s=00:24) and obtained 5.4 h (s=1.3) of sleep. On nights that preceded rest days, participants went to bed at 00:32 h (s=01:29), arose at 09:47 h (s=01:47) and obtained 7.1 h (s=1.2) of sleep. Mixed model analyses revealed that on nights prior to training days, bedtimes and get-up times were significantly earlier (p<0.001), time spent in bed was significantly shorter (p<0.001) and the amount of sleep obtained was significantly less (p<0.001), than on nights prior to rest days. These results indicate that early-morning training sessions severely restrict the amount of sleep obtained by elite athletes. Given that chronic sleep restriction of <6 h per night can impair psychological and physiological functioning, it is possible that early-morning schedules actually limit the effectiveness of training.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24444223

Contact me iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au 

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

Twitter @sleep4perform

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 4: Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Sleep: a Review of the Literature

October 24, 2018

In this weeks episode we take a look at a review paper on Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Sleep: a Review of the Literature. You can access the full paper here via ths link https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28349316/

The current review aims to summarize the state of research on cannabis and sleep up to 2014 and to review in detail the literature on cannabis and specific sleep disorders from 2014 to the time of publication.

Contact me at iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au 

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 3: Laboratory and home comparison of wrist- activity monitors and polysomnography in middle-aged adults.

October 18, 2018

In this weeks episode we review a paper I had published earlier this year.

Laboratory and home comparison of wrist-activity monitors and polysomnography in middle-aged adults.

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s41105-017-0130-x

Accurate measurement of time at lights out is essential for calculation of several measures of sleep in wrist-activity monitors. While some devices use subjective reporting of time of lights out from a sleep diary, others utilise an automated proprietary scoring algorithm to calculate time at lights out, thereby negating the need for a sleep diary. This study aimed to compare sleep measures from two such devices to polysomnography (PSG) measures (In laboratory) and against each other when worn at home (At home). Fifty middle-aged adults from the Raine Study underwent overnight PSG during which they wore an ActiGraph™ and a Readiband™. They also wore both devices at home for 7 nights. The Readiband uses an automated proprietary algorithm to determine time at lights out whereas the ActiGraph requires completion of a sleep diary noting this time. In laboratory, compared to PSG: Readiband underestimated time at lights out, sleep onset, and wake after sleep onset, overestimated sleep latency and duration (p < 0.001 for all); while ActiGraph underestimated sleep latency and wake after sleep onset and overestimated sleep efficiency and duration (p < 0.001 for all). Similar differences between devices were observed on the laboratory night and when at home. In conclusion, an automated algorithm such as the Readiband may be used in the same capacity as the ActiGraph for the collection of sleep measures including time at sleep onset, sleep duration and time at wake. However, Readiband and ActiGraph measures of sleep latency, efficiency and wake after sleep onset should be interpreted with caution.

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S4P Special Episode #4 with Dr Reid Reale, Making weight in Combat Sports

October 15, 2018

An old recording from a discussion with my friend Dr Reid Reale in Essen, Germany last year. The sound quality is not great within this episode from my side but Reid comes across loud and clear with some great wisdom on making weight in combat sports. I hope you enjoy this special epsiode.

Check out Reid's website http://combatsportsnutrition.com

Check out some of his great resources on his site.

Cheers Dr Ian C Dunican  

iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au

Twitter @sleep4perform

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 2: Adverse childhood experiences are associated with adult sleep disorders: a systematic review.

October 9, 2018

In this week's sleep science audio abstract we take a look at the adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). ACE represents substantial threats to public health and affect about 58% of youth in the US. In addition to their acute effects such as injury and physical trauma, ACEs are associated with an increased risk of several negative health outcomes throughout the life course. Emerging evidence suggests sleep disorders may be one such outcome, but existing studies have not been systematically reviewed and summarized. This systematic review summarizes the evidence concerning the relationship between ACEs and sleep disorders and disturbances, with a focus on adult women.

Adverse childhood experiences are associated with adult sleep disorders: a systematic review https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4635027/

More information on ACE https://www.samhsa.gov/capt/practicing-effective-prevention/prevention-behavioral-health/adverse-childhood-experiences

Take the ACE questionairre here https://www.ncjfcj.org/sites/default/files/Finding%20Your%20ACE%20Score.pdf

iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au 

Twitter @sleep4perform

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

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S4P Science review, episode 1: The Effects of Sleep Extension on Sleep, Performance, Immunity and Physical Stress in Rugby Players 

October 1, 2018

Access the full paper here: The Effects of Sleep Extension on Sleep, Performance, Immunity and Physical Stress in Rugby Players https://www.mdpi.com/2075-4663/6/2/42/htm

Contact me 

Dr Ian C Dunican

iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au 

Twitter @sleep4perform 

And check out Dr Amy Bender on Twitter @sleep4sport

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