S4P Radio, Season 3, Episode 2: The History of Sleep with Prof Roger Ekirch

February 12, 2019

In this episode I have the privilege of talking with the great Roger Ekirch. Roger was a great guest on the podcast, and it was a joy to talk to Roger about the history of sleep. We discuss the change in how we sleep since the industrial revolution and how we may not sleep so well sleep since the invention of electricity. I really enjoyed this conversation with Roger, I hope you do too. 

Please click on the link to listen to my podcast episode with Professor Roger Ekirch “The History of Sleep” Season 3, Episode 2 of Sleep4Performance radio.

As always please send your questions or feedback to me at ian.dunican@sleep4performance.com.au

www.sleep4performance.com.au

If you like the podcast please leave us a review on iTunes or Podbean, we would really appreciate as we are trying to get the podcast to as many people as possible.

Contact or follow Roger

Roger Ekirch
Professor, Department of History
Virginia Tech
email:  arekirch@vt.edu
www.history.vt.edu/ekirch

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Ekirch

 

 

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S4P Radio Sleep Science Audio Abstract 9 : Do players and staff sleep more during the pre-or competitive season of elite rugby league?

January 20, 2019

In this episode of S4P we take a look at "Do players and staff sleep more during the pre- or competitive season of elite rugby league?" by Johnpaul Caia, Tannath J. Scott, Shona L. Halson & Vincent G. KellyThis study establishes the sleep behaviour of players and staff during the pre- and competitive seasons of elite rugby league. For seven days during both the pre- and competitive seasons, seven rugby league players and nine full-time staff from one professional Australian rugby league club had their sleep monitored via wrist actigraphy and self-report sleep diaries. Two-way
repeated measures analysis of variance determined differences between the pre- and competitive season in players and staff, with effect sizes (ES) used to interpret the practical magnitude of differences. Findings show an earlier bedtime and wake time for players (−34 min, ES = 1.5; ±0.5 and −39 min, 2.1; ±0.5 respectively) and staff (−29 min, ES = 0.8; ±0.3 and −35 min, ES = 1.7; ±0.4 respectively) during pre-season when compared to the competitive season. Despite this, no differences were seen when considering the amount of time in bed, sleep duration or sleep efficiency obtained between the pre- and competitive seasons. Our results suggest that early morning training sessions scheduled during pre-season advances wake time in elite rugby league. However, both players and staff can aim to avoid reductions in sleep duration and sleep efficiency with subsequent adjustment of nighttime sleep patterns. This may be particularly pertinent for staff, who wake earlier than players during both the pre- and competitive seasons.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28585467

Regards

Dr Ian Dunican

iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au

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S4P Radio, Season 3, Episode 1: The Brain Always Wins with Dr John Sullivan

January 16, 2019

In this opening episode of Season 3, I speak with Dr John P. Sullivan. John is a Sport Scientist and Clinical Sports Psychologist. He has over twenty years of clinical and scholarly experience, including his work with the New England Patriots in the National Football League (NFL) for sixteen years assisting with the coordination of sport science and clinical care. Dr Sullivan’s experience also includes such work within the National Basketball Association, Major League Soccer, British Premier Football League, Premier Rugby League, Australian Football League and Olympic national teams. He is an expert consultant for the elite military of the Department of the Navy and law enforcement in regard to performance and welfare needs.

As the Clinical Sport Psychologist/Sport Scientist for Providence College and the University of Rhode Island, he maintains positions in Sports Medicine and Sport Science. He is also the Assistant Director of the South County Sports Medicine Concussion Clinic in Wakefield, Rhode Island.
Dr Sullivan is a visiting scholar/sport scientist at the Queensland Academy of Sport (QAS)/Australian Institute of Sport (AIS). Dr. Sullivan also serves as an Instructor/Supervisor for Brown University Medical School Sports Medicine Fellowship.

He provides consultation to the NFL office on issues related to well-being and performance and is a member of the mental/behavioural health advisement group. Dr Sullivan was one of five national experts identified by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) to provide expert contribution to new guidelines for the NCAA Sports Medicine Handbook, and he is the co-lead author for the interdisciplinary consensus statement regarding the treatment of mental health issues with student-athletes, which is sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) and the NCAA. Dr Sullivan also serves as a Scientific Advisory for five sport technology companies providing support and oversight throughout the development process.

He has co-authored three recent chapters; the first on the merging of technology, neuroscience, biofeedback, and sport/performance psychology in Sport psychology: On the way to the Olympic Games; and the second chapter focusing on well-being and mental health issues in athletes within fundamental concepts in sport and exercise psychology; A project sponsored by the International Society of Sport Psychology, and the third chapter for the American Psychological Association (APA) book - Career Paths in Psychology: Where Your Degree Can Take You 3rd edition - focusing on working in sport and the role of Sport Psychologists and properly defining the title, role, and credentials.

Web and Social Media Links:

www.TheBrainAlwaysWins.com

www.PerformanceDocs.com

LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/in/sportpsychologist

Instagram @TheBrainAlwaysWins

Twitter @BrainAlwaysWins

Contact me

Dr Ian Dunican

iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au

www.sleep4performance.com.au

Twitter: @sleep4perform

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S4P Radio, Special Episode: Diet and Performance with a Type 1 Diabetic Endurance Athlete

January 15, 2019

Diagnosed with type 1 in 2001, Bec is passionate about making a positive change in the type 1 community. She holds qualifications in Law and Arts (UWA), a Masters in Public Health (USyd), and a Diploma of Business (Governance). Bec is an Adjunct Research Fellow at Curtin University, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Community Directors and a Fellow of Leadership WA. She is the only Australian to have been selected as one of the 100 Fellows of the global Facebook Community Leadership Program. Bec believes that there are no limits on life with type 1 diabetes, and she has swum solo across the 20-kilometre Rottnest Channel, sailed across the Atlantic, and become a SCUBA dive guide to prove it.

Support Bec as she trains hard to complete the gruelling Rottnest Channel Swim..20km in open water. Click here to donate 

DONATE TO BEC

All money raised will go towards supporting the Type 1 Family Centre https://www.type1familycentre.org.au/

Recommended reading that we discussed during this episode

  • The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance
  • The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living
  • Dr Bernstein's Diabetes Solution

Contact me iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au

Twitter @sleep4perform

Sleep Well

Dr Ian Dunican

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S4P Radio Kicking off 2019: Mental Toughness with K.Bradford Cooper

January 2, 2019

This was an awesome podcast with the great K.Bradford Cooper, AKA Brad

Brad's background in his own words.....It's been a fascinating ride over the past 50+ years, with certainly many more opportunities than deserved. I've looked to make the most of each of them be the catalyst in helping others move toward #BetterThanYesterday through optimizing human potential within the realities of life. Highlights include:

*30+ years of experience in health & wellness, including CEO of US Corporate Wellness (since 2007) Co-founder of the Catalyst Coaching Institute (2011), and 3 decades as a licensed Physical Therapist & Certified Athletic Trainer

*Extensive educational foundation, including dual Masters degrees (MSPT & MBA) along with current PhD candidacy (targeting 2020 completion)

*Author of five books, national columnist since 2000, two-plus decades of speaking experience at events across all 50 states and the UK, and featured in the documentary film Godspeed, which was seen in 600 theatres nationwide in 2018

*Generously identified by multiple publications as the "World's Fittest CEO" based on back to back to back results in the Race Across America, Ironman Triathlon and Marathon

Along the way, I've fallen deeper in love with my bride of 26 years, treasured being Dad to 3 incredible kids, secured 2 US Patents for an invention, completed 11 Ironmans (4 times at Kona), have met some amazing people and realized how much there still is to learn and do!

US Corporate Wellness (USCorporateWellness.com) is the premier national provider of personalized employee wellness programs and one of only 8 national firms to earn Full Accreditation as a Comprehensive Wellness Provider through URAC.

The Catalyst Coaching Institute (CatalystCoachingInstitute.com) offers the CWC (Certified Wellness Coach) certification and MCWC (Master Certified Wellness Coach) to coaches across the globe

Email: bcooper@uscorporatewellness.com

Twitter: @Catalyst2Thrive 

Website: www.USCorporateWellness.com  and at https://www.catalystcoachinginstitute.com/ 

Podcast: Catalyst Health & Wellness Coaching Podcast on iTunes here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/catalyst-health-wellness-coaching-podcast/id1434101390 

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/optimalhumanperformance

 

Don't forget, if you wish to contact me

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

Twitter: @sleep4perform

iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au 

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 8: Sleep disorders and problems in an elite super rugby union team

November 22, 2018

Ian C. Dunican, Jennifer Walsh, Charles C. Higgins, Maddison J. Jones, Kathleen Maddison, John A. Caldwell, Hillman David & Peter R. Eastwood (2018) Prevalence of sleep disorders and sleep problems in an elite super rugby union team, Journal of Sports Sciences, DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2018.1537092

The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders in an elite rugby union team using in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) and sleep questionnaires. Twenty-five elite rugby union players underwent a night of PSG during the “off-season” of the Super Rugby competition to assess their sleep. Of interest were measurements that detected the presence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; apnea-hypopnea index ≥5 events/hr) and the presence of moderate-severe periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMs; ≥15 events/hr). Players completed sleep-related questionnaires to assess daytime sleepiness, perception of insomnia, risk of OSA, and the presence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and underwent basic anthropometric assessments including body mass index and neck circumference. OSA was present in 24% (n=6) of players and PLMs ≥15 events/hr in 12% (n=3). Questionnaire responses showed that all players had insomnia defined subthreshold insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, two players were identified as being at risk for OSA and none were classified as having RLS. In conclusion, sleep disorders and excessive sleepiness are common in elite rugby union players. A process to identify and manage sleep disorders should be considered by teams to optimise their physical recovery, athletic performance and to safeguard their health.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02640414.2018.1537092?journalCode=rjsp20

Follow me 

Twitter @sleep4perform 

Email: iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 6: Sleep in a live-in mining operation: the influence of start times and restricted non-work activities.

November 7, 2018

In this episode we take a look at sleep in a fly in fly out mining operation.

Abstract: Good sleep is essential for optimal performance, yet few studies have examined the sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early-morning training on the amount of sleep obtained by world-class swimmers. A squad of seven swimmers from the Australian Institute of Sport participated in this study during 14 days of high-intensity training in preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games. During these 14 days, participants had 12 training days, each starting with a session at 06:00 h, and 2 rest days. For each day, the amount of sleep obtained by participants was determined using self-report sleep diaries and wrist-worn activity monitors. On nights that preceded training days, participants went to bed at 22:05 h (s=00:52), arose at 05:48 h (s=00:24) and obtained 5.4 h (s=1.3) of sleep. On nights that preceded rest days, participants went to bed at 00:32 h (s=01:29), arose at 09:47 h (s=01:47) and obtained 7.1 h (s=1.2) of sleep. Mixed model analyses revealed that on nights prior to training days, bedtimes and get-up times were significantly earlier (p<0.001), time spent in bed was significantly shorter (p<0.001) and the amount of sleep obtained was significantly less (p<0.001), than on nights prior to rest days. These results indicate that early-morning training sessions severely restrict the amount of sleep obtained by elite athletes. Given that chronic sleep restriction of <6 h per night can impair psychological and physiological functioning, it is possible that early-morning schedules actually limit the effectiveness of training

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24444223

Contact me 

Iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au

Twitter @sleep4perform

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

 

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S4P Radio, sleep science audio abstract review 5: Sleep or swim? Early-morning training severely restricts the amount of sleep obtained by elite swimmers.

November 1, 2018

In this weeks Audio Abstract Review we we take a look at Sleep or swim? Early-morning training severely restricts the amount of sleep obtained by elite swimmers.

Good sleep is essential for optimal performance, yet few studies have examined the sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of early-morning training on the amount of sleep obtained by world-class swimmers. A squad of seven swimmers from the Australian Institute of Sport participated in this study during 14 days of high-intensity training in preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games. During these 14 days, participants had 12 training days, each starting with a session at 06:00 h, and 2 rest days. For each day, the amount of sleep obtained by participants was determined using self-report sleep diaries and wrist-worn activity monitors. On nights that preceded training days, participants went to bed at 22:05 h (s=00:52), arose at 05:48 h (s=00:24) and obtained 5.4 h (s=1.3) of sleep. On nights that preceded rest days, participants went to bed at 00:32 h (s=01:29), arose at 09:47 h (s=01:47) and obtained 7.1 h (s=1.2) of sleep. Mixed model analyses revealed that on nights prior to training days, bedtimes and get-up times were significantly earlier (p<0.001), time spent in bed was significantly shorter (p<0.001) and the amount of sleep obtained was significantly less (p<0.001), than on nights prior to rest days. These results indicate that early-morning training sessions severely restrict the amount of sleep obtained by elite athletes. Given that chronic sleep restriction of <6 h per night can impair psychological and physiological functioning, it is possible that early-morning schedules actually limit the effectiveness of training.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24444223

Contact me iandunican@sleep4performance.com.au 

www.sleep4performance.com.au 

Twitter @sleep4perform

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